Joe Acquaviva
Joe Acquaviva
Title: Associate Head Coach
Phone: 617-627-3516
Email: Joseph.acquaviva@tufts.edu

Recently promoted to Associate Head Coach of the Jumbos, Joe Acquaviva is in his fifth season working with the Jumbos. He has played a key role in the success enjoyed by Tufts' men's and women's teams in recent seasons.

For 2019-20, both teams were the runner-up at the conference championships. Twelve members of the women's team and 10 from the men qualified to compete at NCAA's before the meet was canceled due to COVID. During 2018-19, Tufts enjoyed great combined success with the men finishing 10th nationally and the women earning a 16th-place NCAA finish that was the team's best since 1990. The Jumbos also had their first NCAA men's champion swimmer since 1982 (Roger Gu in the 50 free) and their first New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) champion women's swimmer since 2014 (Amy Socha in the 200 butterfly). For Acquaviva's first season (2017-18) working as part of the coaching staff, the men's team won their first NESCAC championship and then had a seventh-place finish at the NCAA Championship that was the program's best since 1982. The women's team surged to a fourth-place finish at the conference championship, which at the time was the team’s best since 2013. Tufts improved upon their eighth-place performance from the 2017 NESCAC Championship by 323 points. 

A 2014 graduate of Johns Hopkins University, Acquaviva swam all four years for the Blue Jays and was captain his senior year. While at JHU, he was a 10-time All-American, a College Swimming Coaches Association of America (CSCAA) Scholar All-American, and an NCAA national champion as part of the 800 freestyle relay.  In this time at Hopkins he also coached an NCAA Post-Graduate scholar and the recipient of the NCAA Elite 89 Award.

Acquaviva stayed in Baltimore to obtain a master’s degree from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and was an assistant coach for the swimmng teams. During this time as an assistant coach, the Blue Jays amassed over 50 All-American honors, six NCAA titles, a national record, and a DIII Women’s Swimmer of the Meet honor.

For two years Acquaviva also coached water polo at the club and high school levels with the William Penn Charter School. In addition to the teams finishing with some of the highest point totals in the school’s illustrious history at the Eastern Championships, they were also home to the 2016-2017 Male High School Swimmer of the Year.